Thursday, April 30, 2015

Fill Your Garden With Bee-Friendly Flowers by Denise Devine


Last year I wrote a blog post on the rapid decline of the Monarch butterfly. The three main contributors toward the radical decrease of the Monarch’s numbers are deadly chemicals (especially Roundup), loss of habitat due to development and the disappearance of milkweed, their main food source.

Bees are faring no better. Lawn chemicals (herbicides, pesticides and fungicides), loss of nesting grounds and a decrease in wildflowers have had a negative impact on their numbers. Bees are important to the survival of many plants, including many of the foods we eat because they serve as pollinators and pollination is essential for propagation.


What can you do to help sustain the bees in your area? Turn part of your lawn into a flower garden of native wildflowers. Plant bee-friendly domestic flowers. Select single-flower tops, such as daisies or marigolds and plant a variety to sustain the entire growing season. Below is a list of suggestions, however, you can always ask your local nursery to show you what flowers they recommend for your area. Also, be sure to ask for plants that are chemical-free!

Spring: Crocus, Hyacinth, Borage, Calendula, Wild Lilac
 
Summer: Bee Balm, Cosmos, Echinacea (coneflowers), Snapdragons, Foxglove, Hosta, Black-eyed Susan,
Butterflyweed

Fall: Zinnias, Goldenrod, Sedum, Witch Hazel, Asters

Did you know that bees are blind to the color red? Be sure to mix them with blue, purple violet, yellow and orange flowers. They need a variety of flowers that bloom all through the growing season because most can fly less than a mile from their nests.
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Denise Devine is a USA TODAY bestselling author of sweet romantic comedy and she also writes inspirational romance. You can view all her books and current information on her upcoming book signings at www.deniseannettedevine.com.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

14 comments:

  1. Love your flower garden. The tips on the bees were great. Thanks.

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    1. Thank you! It's a lot of work, but I love it.

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  2. Thanks for the suggestions. I don't know how many of these flowers will grow in hot Arizona, but I'm going to try them.

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    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    2. Sorry! I accidentally deleted the first comment! Your local nursery will be able to help you out with native flowers for your area that attract bees.

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  3. I live in Oregon and I've noticed that bees are on the news a lot lately! Just about every news cast of late has included a story about bees! They must be very important around here!

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    1. A lot of commercial businesses are having to import bees to pollinate their pollinate their crops. Minnesota has bee farms and they truck millions of bees out west, especially California, for pollination, them truck them back home. Unfortunately, about one-third of them die in the process. Some organic farms, like Cascade Organic Farms, is setting aside acreage to plant wildflowers to support more bees so they don't have to import them.

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    2. Congratulations, Valri! You are the winner of the Burt's Bees Essentials Kit!

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  4. I have most of these flowers plus I also have butterfly bushes that the butterflies love. I love watching them fly around on the Bush. I also have bees lots of them flying around. This was a really good article. Thanks for sharing it with all of us.

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    1. I tried to grow a Butterfly Bush twice, but had back luck so I guess my soil isn't right for them. But I do have about 8 different coneflowers and a large phlox garden which seems to attract all kinds of butterflies. I also have those moths that suck nectar like a small hummingbird. Very different looking.

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    2. I started my butterfly bushes when they were very small. I now have 3 very large ones that every year they get bigger. I don't think I've ever seen moths that are like hummingbirds. That would be cool to see. I also have 3 pink bleeding hearts and 1white one. It started with one pink one that my grandmother had here in the same spot over 30 years ago and it's still grows..

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  5. I'm adding a few flowers this year, so I'm going to use your lists, and I just planted a butterfly bush. My husband has decided to try beekeeping this year and after taking classes, is expecting his bees to arrive tomorrow. He wants to do 2 hives, so I'm preparing for honey overflow. Thanks for the tips!

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  6. I'd love to try beekeeping. I just saw a FB pot for a new kind of hive
    that self-drains the honey.

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  7. I never knew bees were blind to red. Thanks for posting.

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